Kids: Modern Day Wrecking Balls

Adults aren’t the only ones damaging their phones. While you might think otherwise because you drop your phone at least 3 times a week, results are in and kids do enough damage on their own.

Besides kids getting gum stuck in their hair or shaving an eyebrow off by accident, 89% of families have had a kid damage a smart phone, tablet or laptop. Guess how much that costs you guys?

If you guessed $11 billion then you’re incredibly gifted and should consider getting yourself on the Price is Right. 58% of families have had kids break a laptop this year alone! And the destruction doesn’t stop there: 55% reported broken tablets, while 39% have had their smartphones destroyed.

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It’s really no surprise if you think about it. We’re handing over hundreds of dollars worth of expensive, glass computer devices to kids younger than ten years old, some of them even toddlers. And a lot of times, we do it so that we can have a moment’s rest, leaving these little tigers unsupervised with their expensive gadgets. So how do parents deal? Minimizing risk by imposing a few rules seems to help.

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No devices at the dinner table would probably reduce ketchup and milk spills and chicken nuggets getting lodged in to keyboards. Similarly, setting a time constraint on how long a child can use electronics would naturally narrow the window of opportunity for device demolition.

Most accidents happen at home, with outdoor and school mishaps accounting for other spaces where kids break stuff. As you can imagine, dropping these gadgets usually does the trick — kids’s are all about overstuffing their backpacks and unloading them like a sac of potatoes. Spilling juice and crushing them is also not uncommon. I can envision a rambunctious bunch just going to town during play time.

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Moral of the story: your precious little ones are breaking your stuff and it’s costing you loads of cash.

By Angelique Picanco